100 Nutrient Smoothie. Robyn Puglia

Fun Find Friday – The 100 Nutrient Smoothie!

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Happy Friday everybody! It’s time once again for Fun Find Friday, where I share my favourite finds or healthy purchases for the week with you all. 

Today I am going to share something that I found really interesting. A smoothie that contains 100 nutrients. Actually, 2 of them! Now, full disclosure, I have not analysed/counted the nutrients myself but the two authors of this recipe are people who are well regarded and who I trust, so in this instance I will take it at face value. But that’s not really the point, even if the smoothie only contains, say, 80 nutrients, it brings me to an interesting thought, which is that we generally do not count nutrients! Some of us count calories, some count macros (fats and carbs or protein), sometimes we consider a single nutrient – e.g. calcium content. I encourage all of you to count your colours every day (red, yellow, orange, green, blue/purple, white/tan/brown – for those of you who are new here). But the idea that we need to be concentrating on the broadest nutrient density possible isn’t discussed in this way much and I LOVE it! 

I believe that our bodies require the broadest possible range of nutrients, even in small doses. I think that this is much better for our biochemistry in general than concentrating on high doses of single nutrients. It’s why I believe we should eat the broadest range of plants possible rather than focusing on a single ‘superfood’ per se. Sorry Kale. 

Of course, due to specific circumstances, sometimes we do need higher levels of something specific, I’m not saying that’s never true. But in general, if you think about variety and diversity, you’re on to a winner. 

The authors of this recipe are Meleni Aldridge and Rob Verkerk PhD, both from the Alliance for Natural Health (ANH). Well known in the health world here in the UK for their work advocating for nutritional science to be preserved, recognised and also raised / kept to a high standard. 

I am providing the ingredients here, but for the full recipe / instructions and info about the specific products used, click on the smoothie title to be taken to the original posts. 

Tropical Green Booster Smoothie:

This delicious and fresh smoothie uses lime, pineapple, coconut, mango, turmeric and ginger among other ingredients, to create a wonderful flavour with loads of healing and anti-inflammatory properties. 

Ingredients:

  • 150ml coconut milk
  • 150ml water 
  • 2 tsp turmeric powder mixed with a splash of warm water or 1 tbsp of freshly grated turmeric root
  • 1/4 tsp natural vanilla essence
  • 1 tbsp maple syrup 
  • 1 tbsp lime juice
  • 1 tbsp grated fresh ginger
  • 1/2 cup fresh mango, chopped
  • 3/4 cup fresh pineapple, chopped
  • 1 tbsp coconut oil
  • 1/2 ripe avocado
  • 2 scoops of Smooth Vanilla Clean Lean Protein
  • 1 scoop of Good Green Stuff

Things I might do differently.

  1. I would probably add a small handful of green leaves, e.g. wild rocket which is my favourite green for a smoothie. The green powder in the smoothie contains dried greens already, but I am always a sucker for the real thing. 
  2. You could probably also switch up the milks and change the coconut milk for a home made milk ( my fav is home-made sprouted walnut milk, which is WAY easier than it sounds btw) if you are that way inclined. 
  3. You could use 2 dates, or a teaspoon of raw organic or manuka honey in place of the maple syrup. 

Chocolate Berry Indulgence Smoothie:

Chocolate. Berries. Nutrient Dense. Do I really need to say anything else? 

Ingredients:

  • 150ml coconut milk
  • 150ml water 
  • 4 tbsp cocoa or cacao powder mixed with a splash of warm water to create a thick paste
  • 1 tsp honey 
  • 1 tbsp coconut oil
  • 1 small handful of blueberries
  • 1 small handful of raspberries
  • 2 scoops of Rich Chocolate Clean Lean Protein
  • 1 scoop of Good Green Stuff

Things I might do differently. 

  1. I would make sure to choose WILD blueberries or bilberries, which I buy frozen. They are smaller and, while even normal blueberries are massively nutrient dense, the wild type are even more so and excellent for the brain in particular. 
  2. I would use organic, raw cacao powder. 
  3. I would probably swap out the coconut oil for 1/4 avocado personally. I think it’s a more nutrient dense alternative. Another option which would taste great in this smoothie would be a tablespoon of cashews or macadamia nuts, soaked overnight in place of the coconut oil. 

Do you ever prep smoothies in advance?

This is one of my favourite mum/morning hacks for sure. I often take 30 minutes on a weekend to make up a month worth of smoothies in bags in the freezer. I freeze all my powders and green leaves, herbs, avocado etc. Everything possible. Then I just add the liquid when I am ready to blend in the morning. That 30 minutes saves me a TON of time and thinking every morning. For the second recipe, in this instance, I would probably mix the cacao powder and water into ice cube trays and then add a single frozen cube of cacao mixture to the bag. 

I have not used the specific branded protein powder or greens powder listed here either personally or with my clients, so I have no experience or feedback regarding taste etc. I do use protein powders and greens powders in my own kitchen though and would substitute my own in these recipes. 

There are no affiliate links here.

Hope you all have a fun and healthy weekend! 

 

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Robyn is a Clinical Nutritionist with a specialised interest in the Functional Medicine approach to health. Robyn is very involved with the field of Coeliac Disease, Gluten-Reactive Disorders and Autoimmune Disease. Her passion for the healing power of food, has led her to work with complex cases, involving multiple diagnoses, and chronic health issues such as ME, auto-immune diseases and fibromyalgia. She also has a passion for working with the growing tide of chronic, lifestyle mediated illness; diabetes, cardiovascular disease and obesity, and runs a lifestyle intervention clinic for these issues. Robyn works with patients to nutritionally support their bodies, so that they can heal. She has successfully helped many people around the world improve their health and increase their quality of life. Robyn sees clients in London, Tokyo and New York, and has a virtual practice that allows her to work with people all over the world.